The Toolbox and Kaleidoscope – Part 2

Part 2: The Kaleidoscope

Kaleidoscopes have fascinated children and adults for generations. According to Wikipedia, the kaleidoscope was invented in 1817 by a Scotsman named David Brewster. If you’re unfamiliar with this instrument (some may call it a toy), the most basic design is a long cylinder with a triangular wall of mirrors lining the inside through which one looks into while holding up the cylinder towards the light. At the base of the cylinder is a clear compartment containing multi-colored objects such as beads. Whoever holds the kaleidoscope can turn this base and witness endless patterns of light and color. With every turn, a new pattern.

Following my thoughts about how everyone is born with the same tools in our planetary ‘toolbox’ but the effective or challenged usage of each tool varies person to person for many reasons, in the analogy of the kaleidoscope, I think of the beads as the energetic pattern formed by the planets at the moment we are born. With each birth, there is a precise turn of the cosmic wheel and at that exact moment, a unique pattern is visible overhead. That pattern is our birth chart.

We are all assembled from the same material, so to speak, and each entry into our human lives is timed according to our spiritual evolution. When the colored beads form the kaleidoscopic pattern we will embody, we enter the doorway into this life and that pattern is our treasure map, a map that holds the key to our understanding, for those of us who choose to read the signs to get a sense of why we’re here and what we came to do with our life.

To many people Astrology seems too abstract or unbelievable, but astrology is only too abstract or unbelievable if people continue to fear it or avoid studying and practicing it themselves. Astrology is the science of the stars. It is the GPS anyone can learn to use to help navigate the journey, to understand their unique kaleidoscopic pattern, to find guidance and insight, and to shed a light on their Soul’s path.

Featured image courtesy wikimedia commons

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